Cutting Costs May Cost You More !

We have been seeing more synthetic underlayment for tile roofs recently, and that is a cause for concern. The price is great, but the quality is not. If you are looking for a long-term solution for your tile roof, be very wary of synthetics.

Here’s why you should be wary of synthetic underlayment

Here’s an analogy. Let’s say you go to Home Depot and buy a big plastic tarp. You pull that tarp tight across some boards, and then you pound a bunch of nails into it to attach it. Is it watertight? No. You just created a bunch of holes in a synthetic surface. In a rather short time, you will have leaks around those nail holes.

The same holds true for your tile roof. When applying fasteners through a synthetic underlayment and cutting holes to allow for penetrations on the roof, the underlayment does not self-seal around the fasteners and penetrations. When you use something more durable such as 2-Ply G40, that material will self-seal around the fasteners and penetrations, and your underlayment will not allow rain to come through.

There is another issue with synthetics, as well. Homes at times will shift when they’re settling. If you have a synthetic underlayment, it does not allow for the bend and flex, as a 2-Ply G40 would. You add the weight of the tiles bearing down on the roof battens that support the heavy tile, and when there is the movement of the roof, the attachment of the synthetics at the battens will flex and bend and create larger holes by your fasteners at the battens. Your roof will leak. A 2-Ply G40 is much more flexible and will endure those shifts in the home.

Is cheap good? It’s probably not a good choice when you are talking about protecting your home from the elements. Most importantly, know what you are buying when installing a new underlayment on your roof.